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and a place of worship wherever they choose. >> connecticut's governor dan malloy told abc news this morning that speedy action by first responders may have very well prevented an even worse tragedy. take a listen. >> we surmise that it was during the second classroom episode that he heard responders coming and apparently at that decideded to take his own life. >> what else, michelle can you tell us about those final moments before adam lanza decided to kill himself? >> reporter: well, those are certainly the detailsa we're hoping that we'll learn about, perhaps at this press conference or in the coming days, exactly the length that adam lansa had to this school, in fact what happened, perhaps they'll have a little bit better timeline. when first responders and law enforcement arrived on scene, they arrived to a very active shooter situation, a very chaotic situation and of course what was left behind is just devastating in terms of what they had to cope and deal with in terms of not just the emotions of this, but also processing that crime scene. so that they're say whether take the most ti
of newtown, connecticut. the people of connecticut can relate to these victims of the assault and all americans can relate to some extent this crime that's occurred. at this elementary school. madam speaker, i have four kids and 10 grandkids, three of my daughters are teachers by profession. my wife is a first grade elementary school teacher. and no parent, no parent ever wants to bury their child. they just don't want to do that. we never want our children to die in their youth. like these children did. so, madam speaker, we mourn with the families of connecticut. we must honor the victims in our prayers and in our words and ask the good lord to bless them, their families, the people of connecticut and yes, our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: the mall shooting that might have been worse and ended in newtown, connecticut, where it's impossible to imagine that it was worse. it's part of an ongoing pattern of c
through the waiting period that connecticut law requires. but he was able to draw from the gun collection of his mother, nancy lanza, who of course he ended up shooting as well. >> earlier today, police said they had good evidence of a possible motive. we did not hear anymore about that evidence in that last news conference. at this point, any indication what that evidence might look like? perhaps a note? >> no, actually, all we know is that it came in response to a question from lester holt about e-mails or writings that adam lanza may have been left around or had been found by investigators and in response to that, lieutenant van, the spokesman for the state police, said there is a lot of good evidence that we've been able to collect. so we can infer that this might involve some writings or things that he's posted, somewhere online, but we don't know that for sure yet. >> michael isikoff, there are still so many, many, many questions that have yet to be answered here. so hopefully we get a little bit more information from police tomorrow. thank you, sir. do appreciate your work, as alwa
they are teaching. when you have a tragedy as bad as connecticut, the teachers on top of the parents have also lost a child. i had two teachers in elementary schools. the security there is as much as the security is going to get in the school. when you look at schools and said, this is the safest place to be. for it to happen in an elementary school, the first school you enter as a child, that is devastating. when you see the parents crying and upset, you have to rush back to your child's school because there has been this devastating event happened. host: you are an educator in baltimore and we are showing the front page of "the baltimore sun." talk to us about the security of your school. what does a person have to do to get into the school during the school day? caller: you have to be bused in, you go to the office to get a pass. the office personnel are not equipped to handle a gunman coming through the door. even if you take the precaution of having the doors locked and going through the office first, there is no security in the office. there is no security guard. you just sign in and say what
children and teachers and others in connecticut, it is a time for congress to begin a thoughtful dialogue on what we can do to deal with these mass casualty incidences in our country. they have been going on for some time, but perhaps when we see the faces of children, principals, teachers, and others that burns upon our hearts and motivates us to take further action. i want to make sure that, mr. speaker, that congress takes the appropriate action in a thoughtful, willful, determined way, and not jump to quick conclusions as if simple fixes will prevent this from happening. first, to the parents of children across america who are asking questions, mr. speaker, i'd like to offer some of this advice and also in my background as a psychologist, it's important for people to remember this, parents should be asking their children what they have heard about the incident. we should listen to their concerns and their emotions. we should answer their questions with age appropriate information. we should support and comfort and reassure them of their safety at home and school. we should observe and
the news about the shootings in connecticut. first i heard three had died. that was bad enough, and then i heard 20 children had died. i was devastated. i have two grandchildren the same age as the children who were shot and killed in newtown, connecticut. on sunday, when i opened the newspaper to read about the shootings, i saw a photograph of one of the children who was killed. her name was emily. a little blonde-haired girl with a beautiful smile. she looked at me from the paper, i saw my granddaughter's elsa and tilly looking back at me. so i come to this issue as a grandparent whose children but for fate could have been in the same situation as the children in newtown. and come to this as a member of congress. you know the people back home in just about every district keep asking us why it is that we can't get anything done here. well, i'm a newcomer. i've only been here about five months, and i know what is going on in terms of the political gamesmanship. this is an issue on which political games have to stop. we should have members of the republican caucus standing with us today and
and in connecticut and not just this disaster but going back to 2011 and the catastrophe that connecticut suffered when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. i want the people to know that they have a real friend in the senator of louisiana. your leadership has been tremendous in this area. i want to briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership that he has in the wake of this disaster in connecticut. he prompely declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the s.p.a. to come along along with fema and the people on the ground that have been there for quite some time, many of the fema officials in advance of the storm. unfortunately, many of these recent storms and their scope and depth and the devastation they cause that we may face a new normal in this kind of catastrophic weather-related event. we need to prepare in the longer term as well as the short term that why the suggests made early this morning and other improvements will be made are so critically important. i think you need to know that the connecticut s.p.a. office has approved $6
. obviously we have been talking about the tragedy in connecticut, but you tweeted if we wait for gun tragedies to stop, before we can talk about smarter gun policies, we'll be waiting forever. >> yeah, there's a divide on the right and left about guns and it is as much cultural as it is political. i grew up in a gun family. my dad is a gun guy, and nra guy, and i have probably been to more gun shows than virtually every pundit who has appeared on cable news this week and i can tell you it's time to close the loophole, reinstitute the assault weapons ban. we're never going to get rid of every gun. you know, hal was talking on the show yesterday about the culture, and there is a fear -- i think if you were to tell gun enthusists that all you wanted to go is register every gun that people owned, make sure that they were licensed, and that's all that was going to happen, and they were confident that that's is all that is going to happen, they would go for it. but the fear they have is somebody is going to come and scoop up their guns. and where does that come from? th
held in may but was changed to today in response to the connecticut school shootings nearly two weeks ago. we'll talk about that buyback program with the los angeles antonio villaraigosa in about 45 minutes. >>> do you have the right to know if your neighbor owns a gun? a new york newspaper says yes. it posted the gun permits in new york counties. each red dot represents a person who has a gun permit. police -- people whose names were posted on this site they're not very happy. we did reach out for a statement from the newspaper, it sent us one "the massacre in newtown, connecticut, remains at top-of-mind for many of our readers. our readers are understandably and keenly interested to know about who owns guns in their neighborhoods." joining me to talk about this is job than lowey, legal director for the brady center to prevent gun violence. good morning, jonathan, how are you? >> good morning, carol. >> thanks for joining us. to be clear you are for gun control so everybody knows. so this newspaper who decided to publish the names of people who own gun permits, do you think it should
morning. are you with us? last chance. we will move on to doreen in connecticut. caller: i'm a small business owner. host: what kind of business? caller: i do alterations. in the evening return our business into a zumba class for ladies. my daughter and i seem to be doing pretty good. the ladies we hire as seamstresses are independent contractors. these are skills they got from their parents who taught them how to sew. we just went and put out advertising saying we needed seamstresses and we got six good seamstresses. we pay them enough that they can get their own health-insurance and they seem to be doing pretty well. i don't think that giving people the assistance in helping to further their endeavors is a bad thing. i think people who tried to stop people from making it further, they are just being selfish, because you can help individuals if they have skills. they don't have to have a college education to have certain skills. you can use those skills to your advantage and still help them along the way. they can get thrown help insurance. small businesses really are not hurting in
from connecticut would like to speak for five minutes. and i was hoping that we could get some time where we could go back and forth and talk about the magnitsky aspects of that legislation now. am i correct, mr. president, the bill has not yet been -- going to be reported now? perhaps we could enter into a consent as to the next 30 or 40 minutes. the presiding officer: morning business is closed. under the previous order the senate will proceed to consideration of h.r. 6156, which the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar number -- mr. mccain: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent further reading be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i also note note the presence of our friend, senator lieberman on the floor, who also has had a major role in this legislation. and i would hope that perhaps he could be -- i ask unanimous consent he be included in the colloquy. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: again, could i ask my friend, senator cardin, i have a statement that i wanted to make before the colloquy, and i know yo
was a semiautomatic rifle similar to the one used in the connecticut school massacre. >>> a $100 million lawsuit is brewing in connecticut following the horrific school shooting. attorney irwin pinski represents a 6-year-old girl who he says has been traumatized by the killings. he wants to sue the state for failing to protect students from foreseeable harm. the state has inutrient against most lawsuits -- immunity against most lawsuits unless permission to sue is granted. >>> the six men arrested in the gang rape of a woman in india two weeks ago are charged with murder following her death. the victim, a 23-year-old medical student, died today at a hospital in singapore where she had been taken for treatment by specialists. security has been tightened in new delhi where thousands of protesters have been demanding greater protection for women in sexual violence. >>> george h.w. bush is still in intensive care at a hospital in houston. family spokesman jim mcgrath says the 88-year-old former president is improving. his conversations with doctors and nurses now include singing. bush is being treat
to the folks in connecticut. having experienced not as large but a similar with representative deferreds who sat next to me on the floor of the senate our hearts and thoughts got to them. even though the secretary of state is the chief election officials in arizona, the real work mostly is, the county level. within our 15 counties we have the election directors who are very bipartisan, multi partisan coming and work across party lines with them, their counties and across the county lines to try to make sure that every arizonan that is eligible to vote gets to vote. we have a very dedicated people what the county levels since kind of a misnomer to say the chief elections officials is that the state and people get the idea of the state wins elections and it's really the counties to the arizona has been served very well by having local officials elected by their friends and neighbors in those counties and communities that conduct the elections and they are more than anyone else interested in making sure that all of their citizens who aren't eligible to vote get the right to do so and make it as
senate, the attorney general of the state of connecticut, elected to the united states senate four times, a vice-presidential nominee in the year 2000, a candidate for president, and i should probably add nearly a nominee for vice president again. that he managed to achieve such prominence while being the least partisan politician i know is a credit to his character and to the exemplary quality of his public service and to the public's too often frustrated desire for leaders who seek office to do something, not just to be someone. he has been a tireless advocate for the rights of the oppressed, the misfortuneate, the disenfranchised. tireless, too, in his concern for the security of the united states, for the strength of our alliances, the excellence of our armed forces and the general progress of our values. he came here to do justice, to love mercy and to walk humbly with his god. it's hard to find anyone here who doesn't like and admire joe. he's impossible to dislike, even if you only know him a little. most of his detractors seem to be people who don't know him and who tend to view
morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> welcome back. since the newtown, connecticut school attack, there's been plenty of talk about arming teachers and two-thirds of americans believe arming at least one official would be somewhat effective against attacks. >> cecilia vega reports. >> reporter: the gun is fake. but these utah teachers fear the threats facing their classrooms is very real. 200 of those teachers became students. packing a conference room on their holiday break to learn how to carry a concealed weapon on the job, and how to protect their schools from an armed intruder. >> the safety is the biggest part and to be able to use them appropriately is really high priority for me. >> reporter: utah is one of few states where public schools allow guns on campus. but in the wake of the shooting at sandy hook, the push is on to add more states to that list. arizona's attorney general wants every school principal or the designee armed. in ohio, applications for one shooting course for teachers are up 20%. arming teachers is a lot like arming airline pilots. simply knowing that someon
interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper appreciation prehuman dimension of representative government in this temple of liberty we know as the united states capitol. senator daniel inouye was born in honolulu hawaii on september 7th, 1924 and was named after a methodist minister who had adopted his mother. in march, 1943, he enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduate
and also some areas across eastern connecticut, parts of rhode island, and eastern massachusetts could be picking up significant snowfall, over six inches possible. pennsylvania, three inches. we could be seeing some here in new york city. >> juliet: all right. we'll get a little snow for the new year. >> eric: tough storm, but these ski areas, ski-related businesses have had two real tough years out of the last three. >> juliet: that's true. >> eric: a lot of people employed in those jobs. >> kelly: it cause a lot of tie-ups for people who want to get home. good silver lining. >> juliet: i got friends coming in from florida today. they're like please, let it snow. all right. now let's get to some headlines. new photos show north korea has repaired flooding damage at its nuclear test facility. it could launch its next missile test in as little as two weeks. that's the analysis of johns hopkins. the report says there is still water streaming out of a tunnel. that could pose problems. >>> if a deal isn't reached by midnight on sunday between labor union shipping at ports from boston to h
of the flag flying half staff because of today's shooting at the school in connecticut. associated press reporting at least 27 people were killed at the sandy hook school in newtown connecticut. 18 of the victims believed to be children. 20 minutes ago president obama address to the nation and said our hearts are broken today. speaking in the white house briefing room the president pledged, she said, quote, we have to come together and take meaningful action. you can see the entire state of the president on the web site, c-span.org. the flag on the u.s. capitol you see the shot flying half staff ordered by speaker john boehner as you know the speaker and the president have been speaking on the so-called fiscal cliff and as part of the washington journal seriously look at unemployment insurance, what is funded and how that might be affected by the so-called fiscal clef. -- cliff. this is about five minutes. >> we turn to unemployment insurance and how the benefits could be impacted. joining for the discussion as the times' national correspondent. thanks for coming in. we want to start the
and connecticut are teaming up to request almost $83 billion in federal help. >>> also on capitol hill, the senate has just passed its version of a defense bill. it's a $631 billion measure. it calls for a quicker withdrawal of u.s. troops from afghanistan and tougher sanctions on iran. it would also give military personnel a 1.7% raise. that vote was 98-0. unanimous. the senate and house must work out a compromise. >>> now we turn to egypt where tv stations are expected to go dark today in protest over the president's recent power grab. tensions are still simmering as thousands of demonstrators have taken their anger back to tahrir square. abc's alex marquardt reports. >> reporter: they came by the tens of thousands, hurling stones, pulling down barricades, riot police fired volumes of tear gas and retreated. as the masses grew, president mohammed morsi left the palace. ever since the revolution that captivated the world, egypt has struggled on the road to democracy. two weeks ago president morsi gave himself unchecked powers he says to put egypt on a democratic path. there was outrage on tahrir
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19